News — literature

Literary knits: The best of Jane Austen. A book review

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Do you enjoy knitting and reading? If you are a fan of Jane Austen and an avid knitter, you will love this beautiful book. "The Best of Jane Austen Knits: 27 Regency-Inspired Designs", edited by Amy Clarke Moore is a gorgeous collage of beautiful knitting patterns. Stunning photographs and information about Jane Austen and her time and life provide the reader with a real sense of living history. Of particular interest to yarn and fibre enthusiasts is information on yarns, knitting and dressmaking in Regency England. The book is beautifully styled, with great attention to detail. It truly evokes a time and place when beauty was more important than function.  The...

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Knitting in literature: Barbara Kingsolver

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I mentioned in my previous blog post that American author Barbara Kingsolver was involved in the creation of the movie "Yarn" that is currently screening in various locations across the US.  She also wrote a literary ode to knitting titled "Where it Begins" which was published by Orion Magazine in late 2013 and later appeared in the anthology "Knitting Yarns. Writers on Knitting," edited by Ann Hood. "Where it Begins", more poetry than prose, describes the beginning of knitting on a winter's day, when children's feet look cold and clammy and picking up needles and yarn is a way to keep everybody around warm. Or the long...

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Spinning the clouds

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I had a look through our old books this weekend and came across a lovely 1914 edition of "A book of Myths" by Jean Lang.

I started reading and came upon the myth of Freya, the Book of Myths - I Wool Knit
Queen of the Northern Gods and wife of Odin.

Our weekdays still remind us of those Gods of old, and Friday, of course, "was the day of Freya, "The Beloved," gentle protectress, and most generous giver of all joys, delights, and pleasures." 

As it turns out, Freya was not only a beautiful, mythical goddess, she was also revered for her cloud spinning, and Orion's Belt was known as her spindle, as Jean Lang writes in her beautiful, flowery prose:

 

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