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Yarn review: ggh Manila

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We have many beautiful yarns in stock. I enjoy the look and feel of the different yarn qualities, but to really appreciate the quality of a particular yarn it helps to actually experience working with it. I have been knitting a lace yoke top with ggh Manila, one of our gorgeous summer yarns and I just love it! Manila is a natural yarn blend made from 57% viscose, 33% cotton and 10% linen.ggh Manila cotton linen blend knitting yarn - I Wool Knit

A quick word about viscose: Viscose is derived from natural cellulose materials such as wood pulp or bamboo and is therefore a natural fibre.  It has many of the qualities of cotton, such as high breathability and an ability to absorb moisture. It also has a smooth silk-like feel with a subtle sheen.

The process of creating viscose is more involved than spinning cotton or linen, as the cellulose has to be broken down first to create silk-like fibres suitable for spinning. Early attempts to create man-made silk were made in the mid-1800s, and in 1894, the first practical process for 'viscose' was patented. For those who love working with bamboo it is worth noting that bamboo yarn is a classic viscose yarn, and many yarns that are labelled 'viscose' are actually wholly or in part made from bamboo fibres.

Leaf Yoke Top in ggh Manila yarn - I Wool KnitThe first impression of ggh Manila yarn is that is incredibly soft. The silky viscose fibre is spun loosely around the cotton-linen core.

That means that you should use good quality needles, as cheapish plastic ones will get stuck on the finer fibres.

I have been using KnitPro needles with wooden tips, and they worked like a treat. 

When knitted, the yarn displays a subtle thick-and thin character, a bit like homespun. This underlines the hand-made character of your work. I really enjoy this and love the way it turned out. However, if you are after something that is perfectly even and regular, you should use a more tightly plied yarn such as Top Cotton, Cotton Soft DK or Linova

For the lace top, I used a Vogue pattern by Angela Hahn, which I found on Ravelry. The pattern can be purchased directly as a download from the Vogue Knitting website.

We also have a range of Rebecca Knit Kits available for Manila yarn, including tops and lacy beanies. You can find our entire Rebecca Knit Kit range here: https://www.iwoolknit.com.au/collections/rebecca-knit-kits.


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